Delivering a project and presenting to a multi-level audience

The final step of the project has finally arrived. Developing and completing the project is one thing, but trying to get people to buy and use the product is a completely different animal. Just because you believe you’ve created something amazing, and the client believes it will do well, doesn’t necessarily mean that anyone will support it. When product stakeholders create their user stories, they always have an audience in mind. Whether it be for children, adults, or the elderly, the product itself, as well as how it’s being presented needs the team to keep in mind its development and presentation.

The most general form of presentations in a company.

Presentation can be in the form of advertisements, keynotes, and various other formats. Generally it really just depends on the audience targeted. Teenagers tend to be easily targeted by word of mouth and celebrity advertising, whereas those interested in technology are the ones watching keynotes. Different targets call for different formats.

Depending on the demographic you’re targeting, this new product you have created must be fresh and something worth having. If your company is fairly new in the scene, there is going to be some trouble getting a foot in the door if the product offered is stale. There is no demographic, save for maybe the elderly, that enjoys the same old thing time after time again.

As for internally within a company, generally teams will present projects in a traditional PowerPoint keynote. The vocabulary used within the keynote should fit that of the expertise of the audience. For example, CEOs and Vice Presidents of companies tend to be more business-orientated and may not understand technical specifications, and therefore lose interest fairly quickly. Basically, you just need to keep in mind of your target and have the sense to adapt to your target.

Steve Jobs believes you too can give a great presentation.

 

Furthermore, you aren’t going to be the best at presenting right away. Most people aren’t born charismatic and will have trouble trying to convey and sell the product to others, but that’s okay. According to BusinessWeek columnist Carmine Gallo in an article describing the presentation practices of Steve Jobs, a major key in his presentation style is practicing. “Nobody is born knowing how to deliver a great PowerPoint presentation. Expert speakers hone that skill with practice” (Gallo, 2012). The famous proverb states, “Practice makes perfect”, and in this case, practicing your presenting skills will only make it easier on yourself.

Presenting and getting your product out there can be a difficult task, but these steps can help the product succeed. Keep the target audience always in mind as they are who the product is for. Make sure to utilize the correct type of presentation, as different demographics are exposed to different types more often. Make sure that the product is something worth having, and isn’t just dust on the shelf. Finally, make sure you practice your skills. Presenting is a useful tool and can greatly enhance the product itself if the team makes it shine.

 

Gallo, C. (October 2012). 11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs. Forbes. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2012/10/04/11-presentation-lessons-you-can-still-learn-from-steve-jobs/

Image credit to http://pandodaily.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/freevector-presentation.jpeg

Image credit to http://cdn.bgr.com/2011/09/jobs_point110825140829.jpg

 

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2 comments

  1. Hi Aidan, I totally agree that the soft skills that we are presenting in front of clients or employers must be relevant and something that they are looking for. If we just misrepresent ourselves in front of the audience, not just we are wasting our effort to develop the hard skills but missing a chance to promote, get a job, and many other life opportunities. If we just become confident like Steve Jobs and love the job that we are doing, I believe the soft skills follow your heart. Keep up the great work!!

    Like

  2. Hi Aidan, I actually really like and agree with everything you said. You put a very neat and general overview of what everyone needs to keep in mind before delivering a product. And it is true, before delivering something we need to have an idea the kind of product we are offering and who are we trying to attract.

    Like

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